The State Park Movement in America: A Crictical Review

By Ney C. Landrum | Go to book overview

15
Anything Goes
An Age of Expansion, Experimentation, and Expediency

A Point of Divergence

For five decades or so following the first unifying influence of the National Conference on State Parks, America’s state park programs forged steadily ahead, generally pursuing a common goal: to get bigger and more popular. The multifold increases in acreage and visitors during that time would suggest that they had succeeded admirably on both counts. The NCSP’s once ambitious slogan of “a park every hundred miles” had long since become obsolete. It was now virtually impossible to venture even half that distance without encountering one or more state park properties of some sort—and the people were flocking to them in droves.

Although more difficult to measure, the state parks had probably gotten better as well—but how much, and in what ways? Lacking any reliable means for evaluating park quality, the determination of what is good (or better, or best) must, for now anyway, be left to the subjective judgment of the park users. But if specific evidence of quality improvement was elusive, other signs on the horizon were crystal clear: Many of the state park programs were indeed changing, whether for better or worse.

Having achieved a degree of maturity, most of the state park programs were now ready to spread their wings and test their newfound independence and selfconfidence. There were a number of factors at play here. Gone from the scene were the NCSP and—for all practical purposes—the National Park Service, which for so long had effectively held sway over the dimensions and the direction of the state park movement. In their place was a new organization, the National Association

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The State Park Movement in America: A Crictical Review
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.