The State Park Movement in America: A Crictical Review

By Ney C. Landrum | Go to book overview

Index
Page numbers in italics refer to illustrations.
Acreage: of national parks, 4, 147, 257; of state parks, 4, 137, 147, 167, 193, 194, 212–15, 262, 264
Adirondack Forest Preserve, 214
Adirondack Mountains, 10, 38n10, 53
Agriculture Department, U.S., 127, 129, 146, 148
Alabama: Cheaha State Park, 137; Civilian
Conservation Corps (CCC), 137; lodging at state parks, 238; Oak Mountain State Park, 147; statistics on state parks in, 262–63; taxation, 245
Alaska: Chugach State Park, 217; national
parks in, 257; state parks in, 168, 201; statistics on state parks in, 262–63
Albright, Horace: and Bureau of Outdoor
Recreation, 187–88; and “Common Ground for Common Goals” conference, 203; as director of National Park Service, 115, 119, 129, 135, 206; on Mather’s interest in state parks, 76, 79; and National Conference on State Parks (NCSP), 82; and Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission (ORRRC), 187; and state parks, 115, 206
Alexander, Glen, 208
American Association of Park Superintendents, 8
American Civic Association, 76, 80, 98, 118, 119
American Institute of Park Executives, 98, 172, 180, 183, 196
American Nature Association, 96
American Park Society, 98
American Physical Education Association, 8
American Planning and Civic Association (APCA), 119–20, 196
American Recreation Association, 196
American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, 53, 98
American Tree Association, 109
Ancient civilizations, 15
Angel Island State Park, 159
Antiquities Act (1906), 75
Anza-Borrego State Park, 217
APCA. See American Planning and Civic Association (APCA)
Arapaho Tribe, 45
Area Redevelopment Act, 190
Arizona: Grand Canyon in, 9, 75, 80, 205; intervention by National Conference on State Parks (NCSP), 172; lottery, 245; proposal by, for takeover of national parks in, 205; statistics on state parks in, 262–63;
Tubac Presidio, 168
Arkansas: lodging at state parks, 238; and Mena National Park, 117; mineral springs and hot springs, 10, 28–29, 101; Ouachita Mountains, 101, 117; Petit Jean State Park, 101, 117; statistics on state parks in, 262–63; taxation, 245
Armed Forces. See Military; World War II
Aroostook State Park, 137
Arrow Rock Tavern, 103
Aspinall, Wayne, 194
Association of Southeastern State Park Directors, 164, 170, 171, 209
Athletics, 7–8, 236–37
Atlantic Monthly, 195
Attendance statistics for state parks, 160, 167, 168, 212–13, 240, 246, 263, 265
Automobiles, xii, 160
Babylon, 15, 17
Backbone State Park, 71
Badlands, 117–18

-273-

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