Religious Liberty in Transitional Societies: The Politics of Religion

By John Anderson | Go to book overview

4
The former USSR: Russia and the successor states

Our study so far has concentrated on Southern and Central Europe, but it was developments in the field of religion–state relations in the former USSR that initially stimulated this attempt at comparative research. It was in the Soviet Union that there first emerged the communist political system that was to form the basis for the creation of polities of a similar type in various parts of the world. Policies pursued by Moscow often provided an exemplary model for other communist rulers to follow, though many of these states eventually modified them to suit local circumstance. In the field of religion this meant seeking to eliminate religious influences from public life, though different states varied in the extent to which they made this a priority. Even within the fifteen republics that made up the USSR during the post-Stalin years, anti-religious policies were pursued with varying degrees of enthusiasm and success. Under Mikhail Gorbachev the official commitment to the creation of an atheist society was dropped and by the early 1990s nearly all of the newly independent republics had adopted policies and laws that were more favourable to religion and which formally reduced or removed state intervention in religious life. In the case of Russia the legal situation prevailing in the early 1990s allowed for the emergence of a religious free market in which both indigenous religious minorities as well as the far less numerous ‘new religious movements’ could flourish and propagate their teachings. Though the latter groups had far fewer adherents than indigenous communities, a sensationalist media and a fearful Orthodox Church contributed to a rhetoric centred on an ‘invasion of the sects’ that was undermining Russian unity and destroying families at a time of great uncertainty. For that reason, in Russia and many of the other postSoviet states there emerged calls for the passage of stricter legislation that would reinforce the position of ‘traditional’ religious communities and impose some limits on the activities of ‘sects’. In a study of this size it is impossible to do justice to developments in all of the fifteen successor states, and here we simply offer an account of how Russia has dealt with the questions of ‘recognition’ and ‘restriction’, and present a series of

-115-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religious Liberty in Transitional Societies: The Politics of Religion
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 219

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.