Into That Silent Sea: Trailblazers of the Space Era, 1961-1965

By Francis French; Colin Burgess | Go to book overview

10. Stepping into the Void

Often the test of courage is not to die, but to live.

Vittorio Alfieri

It was an astonishingly simple plan and one quite breathtaking in its audacity. A gamble for glory that would earn acclaim and tremendous banner propaganda for the Soviet Union but that would subsequently attract justifiable criticism when the full facts were revealed. Words such as reckless, hazardous, and ill-conceived would later be attached to the first manned flight of the Voskhod spacecraft, yet that flight created history at a time when the world was breathlessly anticipating each new space spectacular.

In December 1957 a group of talented young Soviet designers, most of whom had recently graduated from technological institutes in Moscow and Leningrad, was assembled in the planning section of design bureau OKB-I. Their mission was to begin detailed studies of manned orbital flight and to develop spacecraft capable of carrying and sustaining future space travelers. Chief Designer Korolev jokingly called these designers his “kindergarten.” Many of them, including a serious young scientist named Konstantin Petrovich Feoktistov, would later become pioneering cosmonauts.

Feoktistov, a name of Greek origin that translates as “loved by God,” was then in his late thirties, held a degree in rocket design, and also maintained considerable authority in this group. Konstantin, or Kostya as he was affectionately known, was born on 7 February 1926, the son of bookkeeper Petr Feoktistov and his wife, Mariya. The family lived in the industrial city of Voronezh, in central Russia. It was his older brother, Boris, who first introduced ten-year-old Kostya to the wonders of space travel by bringing home a book called Interplanetary Travel by Yakov Perelman, which they

-332-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Into That Silent Sea: Trailblazers of the Space Era, 1961-1965
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Foreword - Reflections of a Golden Era ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Introduction xxiii
  • 1- First to Fly 1
  • 2- Lighting the Candle 37
  • 3- The Pursuit of Liberty 76
  • 4- Flight of the Eagle 99
  • 5- To Rise above 127
  • 6- Heavenly Twins 171
  • 7- The Two Wallys 198
  • 8- A Change of Attitude 247
  • 9- A Seagull in Flight 289
  • 10- Stepping into the Void 332
  • References 385
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 398

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.