Silent Gesture: Autobiography of Tommie Smith

By Tommie Smith; David Steele | Go to book overview

5
Run Before You Walk

BY EARLY 1965, the latter part of my sophomore year at San Jose State, the idea of black empowerment was becoming popular, as awareness of a system that was not treating people equally grew. At the same time, my prowess as one of the best sprinters in the world was growing as well. Little did I know that the two forces would converge within me on a single spring weekend.

Already by that time, much had happened in the civil rights movement, particularly down South. The bus boycotts in Montgomery, sparked by the protest of Rosa Parks, had been years before. Dr. Martin Luther King had moved into prominence; the March on Washington had been less than two years earlier, and there had already been several nonviolent demonstrations, many of which had been met with violent resistance. One of the worst retaliations had already been perpetrated: the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama, that killed four little girls as they prayed in Sunday school. The Freedom Rides had begun, and already many of the riders into the South had lost their lives. The Civil Rights Bill had been introduced by Lyndon Johnson. The march in Selma would take place later in that year. And early in that year, Malcolm X was assassinated. History tells us that 1965 was a milestone year in the movement. With everything that was happening, society was growing anxious about the change it was undergoing and about the people fighting for their rights as human beings, exercising the freedom of speech they had been denied but to which they were entitled.

Yet as a student and an athlete at San Jose State even at that time, I wasn’t much in tune with what was going on, although I did know that things were going on. I certainly had no anticipation that I would be a civil rights activist or leader. One of my first memories of the movement was hearing about Rosa Parks, while I was still in

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Silent Gesture: Autobiography of Tommie Smith
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • 1 - Welcome Home 1
  • 2 - October 16, 1968 20
  • 3 - Out of the Fields 42
  • 4 - The Biggest City I Had Ever Seen 73
  • 5 - Run before You Walk 95
  • 6 - The Coach and the Professor 114
  • 7 - Linked Forever 135
  • 8 - No Gold, No Glove 148
  • 9 - Paying the Price 172
  • 10 - Going Underground 194
  • 11 - Families Lost, and Found 211
  • 12 - It Will Outlive Me 233
  • Epilogue - Silent and Eternal 255
  • Acknowledgments 259
  • Index 261
  • About the Authors 267
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.