Adversarial Justice: America's Court System on Trial

By Theodore L. Kubicek | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1. THE PREMISE

In judging the US judicial system, no one group should be blamed for its deficiencies. Let’s just consider each of the following participants and blame them accordingly:

Lawyers are the players in the judicial game of justice. They make the rules, which are designed to give then a fighting chance whether or not their clients are liable or guilty.

Judges, also lawyers, are either trial judges (who run the show) or appellate judges (who concern themselves with prior legal procedures rather than guilt or innocence).

Juries, when used, generally make the final decision. But their hands are so tied that they are incompetent to do it right.

Perhaps the blame lies with the founding fathers who drew up the US Constitution. Unfortunately, they fouled up—or perhaps it is the Supreme Court Justices who interpret the Constitution.

Finally, the general public is at fault because, fearing that someday they themselves might find themselves in court, they are not anxious to change the system. After all, they want a fighting chance to win even though they actually may be liable in a civil matter or guilty in a criminal suit. With our present system, winning, regardless of guilt or liability, is always a distinct possibility and the public knows that.

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Adversarial Justice: America's Court System on Trial
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Table of Contents xi
  • Preface 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Premise 9
  • Chapter 2 - Justice 31
  • Chapter 3 - Adversarial System 47
  • Chapter 4 - The Legal Profession 67
  • Chapter 5 - Legal Procedures 101
  • Chapter 6 - The Judges 121
  • Chapter 7 - The Juries 135
  • Chapter 8 - Reform 153
  • Chapter 9 - Recommendations 169
  • Conclusion 195
  • Author’s Note 197
  • Bibliography 203
  • Index 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 210

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.