Letters from France: The Private Diplomatic Correspondence of Benjamin Franklin, 1776-1785

By Benjamin Franklin; Brett F. Woods | Go to book overview

PART I. ARRIVAL IN FRANCE TO LORD NORTH’S APRIL 1782
PRIVATE ENTREATMENT

Nantes [France], Dec. 8, 1776
To John Hancock, President of Congress

Sir,

In thirty days after we left the Capes of Delaware, we came to an anchor in Quiberon Bay.13 I remained on board four days, expecting a change of wind proper to carry the ship into the river Loire, but the wind seeming fixed in an opposite quarter, I landed at Auray, and with difficulty got hither, the road not being well supplied with means of conveyance. Two days before we saw land, we met a brigantine from Bordeaux belonging to Cork, and another from Rochefort belonging to Hall, both of which were taken. The first has on board, staves, tar, turpentine, and claret: the other Coniac brandy and flaxseed. There is some difficulty in determining what to do with them, as they are scarce worth sending to America, and the mind of the French court with regard to prizes brought into their ports, is not yet known. It is certainly contrary to their treaties with Britain to permit the sale of them, and we have no regular means of trying and condemning them.—There are, however, many here who would purchase prizes, we having already had several offers from persons who are willing to take upon themselves all consequences as to the illegality.

13. On October 27, 1776, Franklin travelled to France aboard the 16-gun sloop Reprisal, commanded by Captain Lambert Wickes. On 3 December they landed at Auray in Brittany, and Franklin eventually reached Nantes on 7 December. The voyage, for the times, was reasonably swift, but nonetheless hard on a man of seventy. The sailor’s fare was bad for his health and he found himself poorly nourished and weak upon his arrival in France (Hale 1887, 49).

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters from France: The Private Diplomatic Correspondence of Benjamin Franklin, 1776-1785
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Table of Contents ix
  • Prologue 1
  • Part I- Arrival in France to Lord North’s April 1782 Private Entreatment 7
  • Part II- Franklin’s Private Journal of Correspon­ Dence (Annotated)93 79
  • Part III- Ministerial Dialogue and the Pursuit of Detail 147
  • Epilogue 211
  • Works Cited 215
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.