Thomas Jefferson: Thoughts on War and Revolution: Annotated Correspondence

By Thomas Jefferson; Brett F. Woods | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE

Thomas Jefferson died on July 4, 1826, and was buried beside his wife in the cemetery on the sloping hillside at Monticello. He had drawn the design and left the instructions for a plain obelisk of coarse stone to mark his grave and requested as his epitaph “the following inscription, and not a word more:”

Here was buried Thomas Jefferson Author of the Declaration of American Independence of the Statute of Virginia for religious freedom and Father of the University of Virginia.

He explained that “because by these, as testimonials that I have lived, I wish most to be remembered.”1

Philosopher, diplomat, politician, inventor, writer, architect, and gardener, drawn from his numerous accomplishments, Thomas Jefferson is both an atypical and extraordinary individual—one who was clearly many things to many people. But, too, precisely because of these same collective endeavors, he has become so much a part of the nation’s ongoing search for itself, so deeply implicated in the whole tapestry of American democracy, that succeeding generations are largely unable to see him clearly and objectively in his own life and time.2

From the very beginning, there was a clash between Jefferson, a firm believer in participatory democracy and in the republican form of government, and Alexander Hamilton, Washington’s Treasury Secretary, who espoused a much more elitist form of government along imperial lines. The issues were

1 Cunningham 1987, 349.

2 Peterson 1975, vii.

-301-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thomas Jefferson: Thoughts on War and Revolution: Annotated Correspondence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Table of Contents ix
  • Editor’s Note 1
  • Thomas Jefferson—Chronology1 5
  • Annotated Correspondence 7
  • Epilogue 301
  • Works Cited 305
  • Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.