Chinese Chicago: Race, Transnational Migration, and Community since 1870

By Huping Ling | Go to book overview

FIVE
Bridging the Two Worlds

Community Organizations, 1870s-1945

“On Leong” means peaceful. If they have problems and don’t know
what to do or if there is a dispute about payment of debt, they go to
one of the two co-presidents instead of going to a lawyer. The men
at the meetings hear the story—like a jury. They consult and the co-
presidents hand down a decision. You know, we Chinese like to keep
our problems within our community and solve them ourselves.

—Annie Leong, 1962

Self-government was a prominent feature of the early overseas Chinese communities when they received little protection from either the homeland government or the host country authorities. The Chinese community in Chicago was no exception. The On Leong Association emerged as an effective self-governing body in Chicago Chinatown at the beginning of the twentieth century and remained the most powerful community organization. The leadership positions of the community organizations had been monopolized by the elite members of the community—the Chinese merchants—a pattern that characterized most of the overseas Chinese communities, as the merchants were more educated than the generally illiterate Chinese laborers. While On Leong maintained its dominance in the community well into the 1960s, more inclusive community organizations were also established in the first decades of the twentieth century, providing services to a broader community base and posing challenges to On Leong.


Transplanting Chinese Social Structure

The earlier community organizations were likely conceived and constructed according to ideals and practices transplanted from the homeland, as evi-

-132-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Chinese Chicago: Race, Transnational Migration, and Community since 1870
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 316

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.