T.H. Jones: Poet of Exile

By P. Bernard Jones; Don Dale-Jones | Go to book overview

8
1963–1965
The Last Days -A Small Vision of Hell

The anonymous Times Literary Supplement review of The Beast at the Door appeared on 6 September 1963. Headlined ‘For the most part gloomy’, it stood alongside work by Tom Scott, Edwin Brock and Richard Weber. T. H. Jones was dismissed as an unhappy sheep-farmer with a ‘macabre gift of putting his fantasies in order by bringing mem face to face with the realities of his condition’. His subject-matter was seen as often trivial, and his style ‘so consistent that one ends up wondering whether Mrs Jones looks like a wild crag or Alexander Pope was a secret drinker who took wry amusement out of having his portrait painted’. The first reference is to ‘Cwmchwefri rocks’,1 a richly allusive poem inaccessible to superficial reading. The second, with unintentional irony which would have delighted the Augustan poet, is to ‘Mr Pope’,2 which, in a form and style which could hardly be less ‘consistent’ with ‘Cwmchwefri rocks’, damns contemporary dunces:

How we could use now his pain and his perfection
When the stupid army’s swollen even more,
And literacy has become a means of rejection
Of everything by which Mr Pope set store.

Jones does receive a grudging acknowledgement of his ‘integrity’, but Weber alone is considered ‘a real poet’ because (wonderful irony!) ‘He can lie with aplomb’.

Glyn Jones reviewed the collection in the Western Mail,3 alongside R. S. Thomas’s The Bread of Truth. He saw Thomas’s work as ‘touched with greatness and compassion’; for him it was Thomas who dictated the dominant reading of T. H. Jones: ‘Echoes and prose are the besetting menaces of his poetry and several of the poems here sound like R. S. Thomas, e.g. the fine

-231-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
T.H. Jones: Poet of Exile
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.