Louis XIV and the Parlements: The Assertion of Royal Authority

By John J. Hurt | Go to book overview

3
Venal office and
the royal breakthrough

The magistrates of the parlements, like office-holders throughout the royal administration, held their offices as property in almost the same sense that one owned real estate or moveables – almost, but not quite. More precisely, an officeholder owned the finance or financial assets in the office; he exercised its title, function and authority as a temporary delegation from the king, a usufruct. The king could reclaim the office by refunding the finance to the office-holder; but only rarely did he have the money or the inclination to do so. Most officeholders held on to their posts for life.1

In edicts dealing with parlementary venality, kings often stipulated that office was the most important element in the wealth of the judges and accepted some responsibility for preserving its value. The magistrates happily accepted these assurances and looked to the king when financially pressed. They maintained that wealth imparted status, evoked respect and went hand in hand with the administration of justice, while poverty would render them incapable of serving. Even Richelieu, who considered abolishing venality, consoled himself with this rationalization.2

Modern scholars have adopted a corollary of this thesis, suggesting that the office-holders became so numerous and so heavily invested in venality that they constituted a check upon royal power. Lavisse and Mousnier, although representing different scholarly traditions, shared this opinion, and contemporary revisionists have founded their interpretation upon it. Moote believed that the Fronde taught the monarchy such a political lesson that it resolved never again to risk its authority by endangering interests in venal office. Parker and Mettam, expanding upon Moote and inspired by Beik, thought that the kings reached a social compromise with office-holders, intentionally making them into partners of absolute government by respecting their venal interests and bolstering their economic and social position. Revisionism firmly insists that Louis XIV treated the venal interests of the parlementary judges with particular delicacy. It argues, in the manner of Lavisse and Mousnier, that on the issue of venality the upper magistracy still limited the authority of the king. On this reading,

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Louis XIV and the Parlements: The Assertion of Royal Authority
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables viii
  • Preface and Acknowledgements ix
  • List of Abbreviations xvii
  • Introduction- Sovereignty and Registration of the Laws 1
  • 1 - Compulsory Registration and Its Limits, 1665–1671 17
  • 2 - Victory over the Parlements, 1671–1675 38
  • 3 - Venal Office and the Royal Breakthrough 67
  • 4 - The Ordeal of the Parlementaires 95
  • 5 - The Regent and the Parlements- The Bid for Cooperation 125
  • 6 - Confronting the Parlement of Paris, 1718 149
  • 7 - Sequels 173
  • Conclusion 195
  • Select Bibliography 200
  • Index 216
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 217

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.