The Rise and Fall of American Technology

By Lynn G. Gref | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12. RELYING ON A SERVICE ECONOMY is UNACCEPTABLE

“Build a better mousetrap and the world will beat a path to your door.”—Ralph
Waldo Emerson

Much of the discussion on the rise and the subsequent decline of technology in America rests on examples drawn from the manufacturing sector of the economy. One may argue that as manufacturing becomes less important in the evolving economy then research and development is diminished in importance as well. After all, economic theory holds that as economies mature they move up the ladder from agrarian to manufacturing (industrialized) to service. By some accounts, the service sector already makes up approximately eighty percent of today’s economy and it is time to give up the old paradigms. The fallacy of this argument will be uncovered in this chapter.

The advantages and disadvantages of America’s service economy has received much press (usually negative) relative to such issues as the outsourcing of high paying jobs to Mexico, China, India, and the Philippines; illegal immigration; and the bankruptcy of General Motors and other manufactures in the current recession. To many, the service sector comprises the personal services or menial jobs such as housekeeper, gardener, or hairdresser. However, it is much more.

The service sector is defined officially as comprised of the following business categories: utilities; construction; trade (wholesalers and retailers); transportation and warehousing; information (including software, telecommunications, movie and broadcast); finance and insurance; real estate; professional, scientific and technical services (including computer system design and scientific R&D services); management of companies and enterprises; administrative and support (including waste management and remediation); educational services; healthcare and social assistance; arts, entertainment and recreation; accommodations, and food services; public administration; and other services. Alternatively, it is everything that is not agriculture,

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise and Fall of American Technology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 208

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.