Czech and Slovak Cinema: Theme and Tradition

By Peter Hames | Go to book overview

3. REALISM

Of all the ‘isms’, the various manifestations of realism have been the most discussed and theorised. What is clear is that the terms realism, naturalism, critical realism, Socialist Realism, Neo-realism and even surrealism have been applied to situations in which that particular artistic movement has been regarded as more ‘real’ or ‘authentic’ than others. Frequently, of course, the notion of realism has been linked to portrayals of working-class life, an analysis of the real nature of class relations, the economic relations of the present or visions of an improved or idealised future. Particular forms of realism tend to develop in response to particular forms of falsity. In this chapter, I shall primarily consider films that conform to the traditions of social realism or which attempt to approximate the appearance of everyday life.

Realism in Czech cinema has primarily been seen as a 1960s’ development and was certainly a preoccupation of the New Wave in the early sixties. Its relative rarity in the pre-war period can be seen in the response of Czech critics to Voskovec and Werich’s film Heave-Ho! (1934) as the first ‘social’ film. It was not, of course. Many dramas and melodramas of the 1920s and 1930s could be said to have dealt with social subjects. Přemysl Pražský’s Battalion (Batalion, 1927) is set against a background of a Prague pub whose regulars include thieves, prostitutes and other unfortunates. Carl Junghans’ Such Is Life (Takový je život, 1929), which includes the subtitle ‘the days of the poor have no end’, is an extremely powerful portrait of the life and death of a poor washerwoman. Karel Anton’s Tonka of the Gallows (Tonka Šibenice, 1930) is based on the true-life story of a Prague prostitute. Social injustice and

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Czech and Slovak Cinema: Theme and Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Traditions in World Cinema iv
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- History 15
  • 2- Comedy 32
  • 3- Realism 55
  • 4- Politics 75
  • 5- The Holocaust 95
  • 6- Lyricism 112
  • 7- The Absurd 129
  • 8- The Avant-Garde 144
  • 9- Surrealism 168
  • 10- Animation 188
  • 11- Slovak Directions 206
  • Bibliography 229
  • Filmography 243
  • Index 254
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 264

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.