History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 6

By George Bancroft | Go to book overview
CONTENTS OF THE SIXTH VOLUME.
THE FORMATION OF THE AMERICAN CONSTITU
TION
IN FIVE BOOKS.
I.–THE CONFEDERATION.
CHAPTER I.
A RETROSPECT. MOVEMENTS TOWARD UNION.
1643–1781.
PAGE
Progress of the world by mastery over the forces of nature5
By a better knowledge of the nature of justice6
The laws of morals may be proved by inductions from experience7
First American union. Concert of the colonies in action, 16847
Consolidation of colonies attempted by an absolute king7
Effect of the revolution of 1688. Plan of union of William Penn8
Of Lord Stairs. Of Franklin in 1754. Of Lord Halifax8
Plan of unity through the British parliament. First American congrese9
The elder Pitt and colonial liberty9
The American congress of 177410
Independence and a continental convention and charter10
Question at issue between Great Britain and the colonies10
The confederation imperfect from jealousy of central power10
Rutledge proposes a constituent congress11
New England convention at Boston11
Measures of New York of September 178011
Effort of Hamilton. Thomas Paine and a continental convention12
Greene’s opinion12
Convention of New York and New England at Hartford13
Reception of its proceedings in congress13
New Jersey and the federal republic14
Cession of western lands by New York and Virginia14
The confederation adopted16
Washington appeals to the statesmen of Virginia16
His emphatic letter for a stronger government18
His instructions to Custis and to Jones18

-iii-

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