History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 6

By George Bancroft | Go to book overview

WORKS ON FRENCH HISTORY.

Memoirs of Madame de Remusat.

1802–1808. Edited by her Grandson, PAUL DE RÉMUSAT, Senator. In 3 vols., paper covers, 8vo, $1.60. Also, in 1 vol., cloth, 12mo, $2.00.

“Notwithstanding the enormous library of works relating to Napoleon, we know of none which cover precisely the ground of these Memoirs. Madame de Kémusat was not only lady-in-waiting to Josephine during the eventful years 1808–1808, but was her intimate friend and trusted confidant. Thus we get a view of the daily life of Bonaparte and his wife, and the terms on which they lived, not elsewhere to be found.”—New York Sun.

“These Memoirs are not only a repository of anecdotes and of portraits sketched from life by a keen-eyed, quick-witted woman; some of the author’s reflections on social and political questions are remarkable for weight and penetration.”—New York Sun.


Memoirs of Napoleon,

His Court and Family. By the Duchess D’ABRANTES. In 2 vols., 12mo, cloth, $3.00.

The interest excited in the first Napoleon and his Court by the “Memoirs of Madame de Rémusat” has induced the publishers to issue the famous “Memoirs of the Duchess d’Abrantes,” which have hitherto appeared in a costly octavo edition, in a much cheaper form, and in style to correspond with the lämo edition of De Kémusat. This work will be likely now to be read with awakened interest, especially as it presents a much more favorable portrait of the great Corsican than that limned by Madame de Rémusat.


The French Revolutionary Epoch.

Being a History of France from the Beginning of the First French Revolution to the End of the Second Empire. By HENRI VAN LAUN, author of “History of French Literature,” etc. In 2 vols., 12mo. Cloth, $3.50.

“As a history for readers who are not disposed to make an exhaustive study of the subject treated, the book impresses us as eminently good.”—New York Evening Post.

“This work throws a flood of light on the problems which are now perplexing the politicians and statesmen of Europe.”—New York Daily Graphic.

“This is a work for which there is no substitute at present in the English language. For American readers it, may be said to have secured a temporary monopoly of a most interesting topic. Educated persons can scarcely afford to neglect it.”—New York Sun.


History of the French Revolution.

By Loms ADOLPHE THIERS. 4 vols., 8vo. Half calf, $16.00. Cheap edition. 2 vols., 8vo. Cloth, $5.00; half calf, $10.00.


History of France,

From the Earliest Times to 1848. By Rev. JAMES WHITE, author of “Eighteen Christian Centuries.” 8vo, cloth, $3.00.

D. APPLETON & CO., Publishers,

1, 3. & 5 Bond Street, New York.

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