Chainsaws, Slackers, and Spy Kids: Thirty Years of Filmmaking in Austin, Texas

By Alison Macor | Go to book overview

Tobe Hooper was a director with
a real vision. Even if it meant
killing all of us to get it.
DOROTHY PEARL


1
A Living Nightmare
Tobe Hooper and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

The white Victorian house at the top of Quick Hill Road reverberated with the sound of a woman’s muffled cries. Inside the dimly lit dining room, a pretty blonde struggled against the ropes binding her to a chair. She was seated at the head of a long dining table, its wood splintered and distressed. Streaks of dried blood and dirt caked her light blue tank top and white jeans, and her long hair hung in lank bunches around her face. She could hear faltering footsteps coming down a staircase somewhere to her left. Two figures entered the room carrying a chair that held a decrepit man, his facial features barely visible beneath folds of aged, leathery skin.

The smaller of the two men got behind the woman’s chair, reached down and with a pocketknife cut the rope and freed her right arm. The other man, his face hidden by a crude mask made from human skin, reached for a small carving knife that lay on the table. The masked figure reached over and clamped his beefy hand around her wrist. She began to feel faint. He sliced the tip of her index finger, and a bright bubble of blood oozed from the wound. He slowly guided her finger into the dried-out mouth of the old man, who began to suckle it like an infant as the others watched with morbid fascination. Her eyes grew wide at the spectacle, and she screamed with revulsion. Her eyes rolled back in her head as her body slumped forward toward the table.

-17-

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