Chainsaws, Slackers, and Spy Kids: Thirty Years of Filmmaking in Austin, Texas

By Alison Macor | Go to book overview

Six shortish features and one short culled
by Jonathan Demme on a visit to the Lone
Star State prove not only that independent
features are alive and living on the Third
Coast, but that they can outrun those by
New York and Los Angeles indies.
THE VILLAGE VOICE


3
Made in Austin
The Austin Chronicle and Red Headed Stranger

Joe Dishner was wearing a collared, long-sleeved shirt in the sticky Austin summer of 1981. That fact alone should have conveyed his dedication to the idea of starting an alternative newspaper, but to the gentleman from one of Austin’s largest banks with whom he and fellow University of Texas RTF dropout Nick Barbaro were having lunch, Dishner looked just like any other young entrepreneur eager to convince backers to invest in his project.

The young men made quite a pair. Barbaro wore a suit and carried a battered leather briefcase in an attempt to look more professional, while Dishner toted a plastic Samsonite case.

Still, the lunch meeting had gone fairly well, Dishner thought. He and Barbaro had made an impassioned case for why Austin needed a biweekly paper that would focus on politics and entertainment. The banker seemed mildly interested in the idea. But as the three stood up to leave, with Barbaro continuing to elaborate on one final point, the slightly wild-looking thirtyyear-old reached across the table and grabbed an uneaten pickle off the banker’s plate.

Dishner watched in horror as Barbaro first wagged the pickle to emphasize his point and then bit down on it with a loud crunch.

“Well, we’re fucked,” sighed Dishner to himself. “This guy will never talk to us again.”1

-64-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Chainsaws, Slackers, and Spy Kids: Thirty Years of Filmmaking in Austin, Texas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 360

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.