Chainsaws, Slackers, and Spy Kids: Thirty Years of Filmmaking in Austin, Texas

By Alison Macor | Go to book overview

Slacker resonated for me because Richard
Linklater had found the way to express
the authenticity of Austin life for a certain
type of people that lived there. It wasn’t too
American, it wasn’t too European. Slacker
was very idiosyncratic, like Austin.
MICHAEL BARKER


4
Slacker
The Least Auteur Film Ever Made

In October 1985—the same month that Bill Wittliff and Warren Skaaren participated in the “Independent Images” conference featuring Jonathan Demme and John Sayles—twenty-five-year-old aspiring filmmaker Richard Linklater was preparing to screen a collection of experimental films at Austin’s Dobie 1 & 2 theater. He and Lee Daniel, who shot commercials and made Super 8 films on the side, had convinced Dobie owner Scott Dinger to show the series on the first weekend of every month that fall. Linklater, who had underwritten much of the cost, grew increasingly worried as the initial screening approached. He became convinced the event would tank and he would lose his money even though the Austin Chronicle had agreed to run a free advertisement and a friend had designed an eye-catching flier playing off the program’s tantalizing title, “Sexuality and Blasphemy in the Avant Garde.” The flier featured a provocative image—a man’s hand cupping a woman’s bare breast—from Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí’s Un Chien Andalou (1929), one of the films in the program.1 Borrowing a grassroots promotional technique favored by local bands, Linklater and friends papered the University of Texas campus with the flier

On October 4, the first midnight screening sold out the Dobie theater. In all, two of three screenings sold out, which impressed Dinger. “To be honest, the films that Rick and Lee were showing were ones that I hadn’t heard of. I appreciated what they were doing, but I couldn’t really get behind the films.”

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Chainsaws, Slackers, and Spy Kids: Thirty Years of Filmmaking in Austin, Texas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 360

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.