The Letters of Franz Liszt to Marie Zu Sayn-Wittgenstein

By Howard E. Hugo; Howard Hugo E. et al. | Go to book overview

THE LETTERS OF
Franz Liszt
TO
MARIE zu SAYN-WITTGENSTEIN

TRANSLATED AND EDITED BY

HOWARD E. HUGO

HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS • CAMBRIDGE • 1953

-iii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of Franz Liszt to Marie Zu Sayn-Wittgenstein
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editor's Foreword vii
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One 1848-1860 19
  • Letter 1: Preface 21
  • Letter 2b 24
  • Letter 4b 24
  • Letter 5c 25
  • Letter 6 26
  • Letter 7 28
  • Letter 8: Preface 29
  • Letter 10: Preface 33
  • Letter 10 35
  • Letter 11 37
  • Letter 12 41
  • Letter 14 42
  • Letter 15 44
  • Letter 16 47
  • Letter 18: Preface 47
  • Letter 18 49
  • Letter 19 51
  • Letter 20 53
  • Letter 21a 53
  • Letter 22 57
  • Letter 23: Preface 58
  • Letter 23 61
  • Letter 24 64
  • Letter 25 68
  • Letter 26 69
  • Letter 27 72
  • Letter 28 73
  • Letter 30 79
  • Letter 32 81
  • Letter 33 84
  • Letter 35 85
  • Letter 36 87
  • Letter 37 88
  • Letter 38 89
  • Letter 39 90
  • Letter 40 93
  • Letter 41 94
  • Letter 42 96
  • Letter 43 97
  • Letter 44 100
  • Letter 45: Preface 101
  • Letter 45 102
  • Letter 46 104
  • Letter 47 107
  • Letter 48: Preface 109
  • Letter 49 111
  • Letter 50: Preface 115
  • Letter 51 115
  • Letter 52 116
  • Letter 53 117
  • Letter 54 119
  • Letter 56 120
  • Letter 57: Preface 122
  • Letter 58 124
  • Letter 59 127
  • Letter 60: Preface 128
  • Part Two 1869-1876 133
  • Letter 61: Preface 135
  • Letter 62 137
  • Letter 64 138
  • Letter 65 139
  • Letter 66 140
  • Letter 67: Preface 142
  • Letter 67 143
  • Letter 69 144
  • Letter 70 145
  • Letter 72 146
  • Letter 73 147
  • Letter 75 149
  • Letter 76 149
  • Letter 77 150
  • Letter 78 151
  • Letter 79 152
  • Letter 80 153
  • Letter 82 154
  • Letter 83 155
  • Letter 99 166
  • Letter 100 168
  • Letter 102 169
  • Letter 103 170
  • Letter 105 173
  • Letter 107 174
  • Letter 109 176
  • Letter 110: Preface 179
  • Letter 111 179
  • Letter 113 181
  • Letter 114 181
  • Letter 115 185
  • Letter 116 186
  • Letter 118 188
  • Letter 120 189
  • Letter 123 191
  • Letter 124 192
  • Letter 126: Preface 193
  • Letter 127 195
  • Letter 128 196
  • Letter 129 197
  • Letter 131 198
  • Letter 132 199
  • Letter 134 200
  • Letter 135 201
  • Letter 136 202
  • Letter 137 203
  • Letter 138: Preface 204
  • Letter 138 205
  • Letter 139 206
  • Part Three 1877-1886 209
  • Letter 140 211
  • Letter 142 211
  • Letter 144 214
  • Letter 145 215
  • Letter 147: Preface 215
  • Letter 147 216
  • Letter 148 217
  • Letter 150 218
  • Letter 151 220
  • Letter 153 221
  • Letter 154 222
  • Letter 155 223
  • Letter 156 226
  • Letter 158 227
  • Letter 159 228
  • Letter 160 229
  • Letter 161 230
  • Letter 164: Preface 231
  • Letter 165 232
  • Letter 166 235
  • Letter 167 236
  • Letter 168 237
  • Letter 169 240
  • Letter 170 241
  • Letter 171 242
  • Letter 172 243
  • Letter 173 245
  • Letter 174 246
  • Letter 175 247
  • Letter 176 248
  • Letter 177 249
  • Letter 178 250
  • Letter 179 251
  • Letter 180 252
  • Letter 181 253
  • Letter 182 254
  • Letter 183 256
  • Letter 185 256
  • Letter 187 257
  • Letter 188 259
  • Letter 191 259
  • Letter 192 260
  • Letter 193 265
  • Letter 195 266
  • Letter 197 267
  • Letter 198 268
  • Letter 199: Preface 270
  • Letter 202 270
  • Letter 206 271
  • Letter 208 272
  • Letter 210 273
  • Letters 212-215: Preface 274
  • Notes and Bibliography 279
  • Bibliography 356
  • Index to Letters and Notes 363
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 376

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.