Brewing Battles: A History of American Beer

By Amy Mittelman | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book has its origins in the PhD I completed many years ago under the sponsorship of Eric Foner. Eric taught me how to be a good historian, and encouraged me to improve my writing and thinking. His own body of work set the standard for my achievements. He has always been an inspiration to me and remains so today.

Jack Blocker has been a pioneer in the field of alcohol and temperance history as well as an excellent colleague. He invited me to give my first scholarly paper, and together we, along with several other people, founded what is today the Alcohol and Drugs History Society. It has been my honor to know him for almost thirty years.

Another pioneer in the field of alcohol and temperance history is David Fahey. His unfailing energy and enthusiasm has helped the ADHS thrive for over twenty-five years. On a personal level he encouraged me to turn my research into a book for which I thank him.

The ADHS has been a wonderful presence in the field, increasing interest in scholarship about alcohol and other drugs by sponsoring conferences. The organization also publishes The Social History of Alcohol and Drugs: An Interdisciplinary Journal. As an independent scholar, the ability to have a forum to give papers and publish articles has been tremendously important to me.

A serious non-fiction writer cannot produce an adequate product without the help of libraries and librarians. I am very fortunate to live in Amherst, Massachusetts which has several colleges and a wonderful local library. The Jones

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