The Muslims of Medieval Italy

By Alex Metcalfe | Go to book overview

7
The Muslims in the kingdom of Sicily

Overview and issues of periodisation

The kingdom of Sicily, with its Muslim majority population on the island, played a central role in the formation of medieval Europe during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The rich, mainly Latin, sources which describe the interlaced histories of north and south Italy, and the German and Byzantine empires, also outline relations with the papacy, the crusader states and the Norman, Mediterranean and Islamic ‘worlds’. Given the clashes over the succession of rulers in which the national histories of Italy, France, England, Germany and Spain intersect, the standard periodisation of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries tends to fracture untidily along dynastic lines. The end of the Norman period is sometimes marked by the death of William II in 1189, bringing to an end the Hauteville line. However, it more usually includes the civil war which led to the coronation of Roger’s illegitimate grandson, Tancred (r. 1190–4). It is sometimes extended to the chaos on his death from which Constance (r. 1195–8) and her German husband Henry VI (d. 1197) emerged as rulers. Hence, similarly indistinct origins initiate the Staufen period, dominated by the minority and rule of the German emperor and Sicilian king, Frederick II. Following Frederick’s death in 1250, the search for a ruler, the struggle for Sicily under Manfred and the emergence of Angevin control then form the basis of accounts culminating in the twenty-year ‘Wars of the Sicilian Vespers’ between the Angevins and Aragonese. The Treaty of Caltabellotta, signed in 1302 at the end of the Vespers, came only a couple of years after the destruction of the colony at Lucera to where the remaining Sicilian Muslims had been deported. This serves as the obvious and definitive conclusion for Muslim settlement in the Italian peninsula in the medieval period.

The roles played by Muslims become increasingly peripheral in standard political histories of the region. This degree of eurocentricity is justifiable, not least because the kings’ priorities were more often focused on the threat of invasion by the Byzantines from across the eastern Mediterranean or by German forces from the north, acting in league with discontented factions from within the kingdom. The Sicilian Muslims were not entirely divorced from these contexts

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Muslims of Medieval Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.