Theology of the Psalms

By Hans-Joachim Kraus; Keith Crim | Go to book overview

1. The God of Israel

A. Yahweh Sebaoth

If Ps. 24:7–10 involves part of the ritual of a solemn entrance ceremony that was observed on Zion (cf. Comm. on this passage) then we are justified in regarding

(Yahweh Sebaoth) as the solemn, cultically legitimate name of the God who was present in the sanctuary of Jerusalem and honored there. This divine name, especially the name (Yahweh), points back to the traditions of ancient Israel. In the Psalter the name occurs about 650 times (according to Lisowsky, 1958, who used Kittel’s Biblia Hebraica as the basis; according to Jenni, THAT 1:704, it occurs 695 times). It should be kept in mind that in the Elohistic Psalter (see Comm., Intro. §3) instead of the original name (Yahweh) the divine name (Elohim) is found. In the Psalter the shortened form or is found 43 times (50 times in the entire Old Testament, according to Jenni). For Israel (Yahweh) was purely a name, without any components of meaning that were to be explained etymologically or symbolically. The well-known “definition” of the name Yahweh in Exod. 3:14 presents a theological etymology, but not a philological one, and has no apparent relevance for the Psalms. No less irrelevant are all the attempts to arrive at some “original meaning” of the tetragrammaton by means of philological etymology. Such attempts begin with the question, is the word (Yahweh) a nominal or a verbal form? If, as is usually assumed, a verbal form is involved, we would be led to think of form in the imperfect. But what root is involved? For the various hypotheses, see von Rad (1962) and L. Kohler (1957). But does not the short form which occurs 43 times in the Psalter, represent the more ancient name of Israel’s God? G. R. Driver advanced this view (1928). His starting point was the shout of praise (“hallelujah”), and he thought he could explain the short form as a shout of ecstatic excitement which has an air of originality about it, and which then later, in connection with the events of the exodus from Egypt, was expanded to the longer form (Yahweh). But there is no basis for this explanation. It is much more likely to assume that the shorter form came into use later in shouts during worship and in songs of praise.

The problems in the area of history of religion which are connected with the possibility of discovering the origin of the name Yahweh in the ancient world

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Theology of the Psalms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Contents 7
  • Translator’s Preface 9
  • Introduction 11
  • 1- The God of Israel 17
  • 2- The People of God 51
  • 3- The Sanctuary and Its Worship 73
  • 4- The King 107
  • 5- The Enemy Powers 125
  • 6- The Individual in the Presence of God 137
  • 7- The Psalms in the New Testament 177
  • Abbreviations 205
  • References 207
  • Index of Selected Hebrew Words 219
  • Index of Biblical References 221
  • Index of Names and Subjects 233
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 236

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.