Spending without Taxation: FILP and the Politics of Public Finance in Japan

By Gene Park | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In completing this project, I have incurred many debts to people and institutions that were critical to making it possible. I owe the greatest debt to my former advisors at Berkeley, who helped shape and guide the project from its inception. I initially went to Berkeley to work with Steven Vogel, who provided intellectual guidance and support from my first day of graduate school. I had the great fortune to work with Jonah Levy and T. J. Pempel, who generously read numerous drafts and shaped my ideas at critical junctures. Jonah first suggested the title of this book, which nicely captures the essence of the project. Kevin O’Brien and AnnaLee Saxenian provided advice in the early stages of the project.

I am also appreciative of the many people who helped me with my research. Many individuals in Japan generously offered their time. This work would not have been possible without the many interviews and meetings I had with numerous government officials. Kagehide Kaku provided several key introductions. Mao Guirong helped me navigate the Japanese literature. Iris Hui offered helpful advice on my statistical analysis. Many others provided input at various stages, including John Ciorciari, Eisaku Ide, and Ed Fogarty. The anonymous reviewers will notice the significant contribution they made in improving the manuscript. This project would not have been possible without institutional and financial support. Thanks to Fulbright IIE I was able to spend more than a year in Japan conducting research. The Blakemore Foundation funded my language training. The Japanese Ministry of Finance’s Policy Research Institute (PRI) hosted me for two years. I am very grateful to the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research

-xiii-

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