Banzai Babe Ruth: Baseball, Espionage, & Assassination during the 1934 Tour of Japan

By Robert K. Fitts | Go to book overview

28

The Empress of Canada sailed around the southern tip of Japan and then due west to Shanghai. On December 4 Warstler noted in his diary, “The water has turned yellow.” They had entered the Yellow Sea—a body of water between eastern China and Korea tinted yellow by sands washed from the Gobi Desert. The Empress docked at the Jardue and Mathenson Wharf in Shanghai at nine in the morning on December 5. More than one player groaned as they prepared to disembark. It was a frigid day with a cold mist, and few wanted to play the scheduled game against a local amateur team.

As the players came ashore they were met by representatives of the Shanghai Amateur Baseball Club and swarms of rickshaw drivers. The All Americans split up, each spending the morning sightseeing or shopping. Known as the Paris of the East, as well as the Whore of Asia, Shanghai was a divided city, a city of contrasts. It was a center of education, culture, enlightenment, liberal ideas, and wealth. It was also the home to extreme poverty, opium warlords and their gangs, casinos, cabarets, and brothels. Stuart Bell, who had arrived a few days earlier, found the atmosphere of Shanghai a relief after Tokyo. “It doesn’t make any difference who or what you are in Shanghai, you are welcome,” he told his readers. “The Chinese smiles were spontaneous and not automatic as smiles were in Japan.” And “what nightclubs!” Bell sampled several and ended his night with ham and eggs at three, noting, “Can you imagine ham and eggs at three in the morning? Of course you can unless you have been to Japan where there is no three in the morning and where gendarmes with short swords on their belts would arrest you if you sought such food at three in the morning.”1

Prior to 1842 Shanghai was a small fishing village, as the Chi-

-240-

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Banzai Babe Ruth: Baseball, Espionage, & Assassination during the 1934 Tour of Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Recurring Japanese Characters ix
  • Prologue xiii
  • Part 1 - "When I Say I’Ll Do Something, I Bet My Life on It." 1
  • 1 3
  • 2 12
  • 3 22
  • 4 31
  • 5 34
  • 6 39
  • 7 43
  • 8 55
  • 9 65
  • Part 2 - "Babe Ruth… Is a Great Deal More Effective Ambassador Than I Could Ever Be." 83
  • 10 85
  • 11 88
  • 12 98
  • 13 104
  • 14 113
  • 15 120
  • 16 131
  • 17 137
  • 18 142
  • Part 3 - "The Japanese Are Equal to the Americans in Strength of Spirit." 179
  • 19 181
  • 20 183
  • 21 196
  • 22 198
  • 23 208
  • 24 210
  • Part 4 - "There Will Be No War between the United States and Japan." 219
  • 25 221
  • 26 229
  • 27 234
  • 28 240
  • 29 249
  • Part 5 - "To Hell with Babe Ruth!" 259
  • 30 261
  • 31 266
  • 32 271
  • 33 281
  • 34 284
  • 35 293
  • Appendix 1- The All American Touring Party 299
  • Appendix 2- Tour Batting and Pitching Statistics 301
  • Appendix 3- Tour Game Line Scores 303
  • Acknowledgments 307
  • Notes 311
  • Bibliography 325
  • Index 335
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