River in Ruin: The Story of the Carmel River

By Ray A. March | Go to book overview

6 CARMEL’S THEATER OF WATER
Enter Two Therapists from Oakland

On Monday, August 8, 1921, Anne Nash and Dorothy Bassett, with all their belongings in tow, boarded a southbound train for Monterey. The two hospital occupational therapy instructors from Oakland were moving to Carmel. Dorothy’s mother was already living there, and her brother Willard arrived later to start a newspaper called the Carmel Cymbal. When the two women arrived in Monterey, they stopped to check on their baggage and missed the connecting stage, so they started walking over the hill to Carmel. Luck was with them and they hitched a ride to the lot in the Fourth Addition that they planned to purchase from Frank Devendorf. That night, their first in Carmel, and against the local rules, they heated soup over a tiny fire in the dirt road and slept on a bed of pine needles. By Friday of their first week, they were inquiring about the water supply to their lot.

“Rose at 5 after a delightful night’s sleep on our pine needles,” Anne Nash began writing in her diary. “To the beach to cook our breakfast and then for a long walk by the valley and the woods on the other side. Went to the real estate office … but Mr. Devendorf will be back tomorrow. The rest of my baggage came at 3 and we arranged our temporary camp. Heated beans and had a scrumptious dinner.”

The next day, Devendorf showed them around the undeveloped Fourth Addition, informing them that he doubted he would be able to get water to the lot the two women were most interested in buying, but he would let them know. Anne and

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