River in Ruin: The Story of the Carmel River

By Ray A. March | Go to book overview

7 SARDINES AND GOLF COURSES
Yet Another Dam

Who, other than possibly Charles Crocker, back in 1880, ever dreamed that by the middle of the twentieth century the Monterey Peninsula would be so utterly and completely dependent on a singular source of water of such modest means as the Carmel River? The answer to that question is that Crocker’s successors knew what the future held as long as they controlled the river. S. F. B. Morse, often considered a visionary by his followers, knew because his Del Monte Properties Company owned vast water rights to the Carmel River and much of the land along its banks. Owners of private-interest water companies such as the Monterey County Water Works and its successor, California Water and Telephone Company, knew what the future held because of their unhampered capability to build dams on the river.

Obviously, the two powers are often one and the same or share common interests. The water purveyors were confident that if a dam became obsolete, the easiest and most immediate solution to solving water shortage problems on the Monterey Peninsula was to build another dam on the river. This was especially true when the San Clemente Dam, thought to have a thirty-year longevity when built in 1921, started showing signs of being incapable of meeting growth demands in 1948— twenty-seven years after it began storing river water. All it took to meet the Monterey Peninsula’s growing needs for water, in addition to the San Clemente, was another dam—this time the Los Padres Dam, in 1949. Revealingly, engineers working on

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
River in Ruin: The Story of the Carmel River
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 175

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.