River in Ruin: The Story of the Carmel River

By Ray A. March | Go to book overview

9 DEMISE OF THE STEELHEAD
Anglers Debate the Fate of the Fish

The placement of another dam on the Carmel River in 1949 posed a serious threat to the steelhead migrating from seawater to freshwater during their spawning periods. The status of this native game fish was more important to anglers in the midtwentieth century than to anyone interested in the well-being of the river. But the steelhead were a visible barometer and easy indicator of the river’s health. Protection of the fish was included in the design of the Los Padres Dam. To protect the steelhead a “rescue pool” would be installed on the downstream face of the dam. During the steelhead run each year, the fish would “climb” steps to the rescue pool to avoid possible floodwaters. The plan was then for the fish to be mechanically transported up the face of the dam to the storage upstream by means of a specially built fish elevator, which apparently was never constructed. In its absence, steelhead fingerlings were trucked in by the can-load, hoisted on mules, and packed upstream from the reservoir where volunteers said their silent prayers as the fish were transplanted into river ponds behind the reservoir.

How the fish got back downstream and eventually to the ocean was up to them. After growing up in the vast depths of the Pacific Ocean, steelhead confront a huge unsurpassable concrete wall of the Los Padres Dam’s spillway after first instinctively finding their home waters at the mouth of the Carmel River. Then they must wind their way upriver through shallow pools and riffles, adjust to water temperature changes, and adapt their kidneys from ocean water to freshwater. Finally, they

-118-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
River in Ruin: The Story of the Carmel River
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 175

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.