River in Ruin: The Story of the Carmel River

By Ray A. March | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This is not an inflated metaphor: researching and writing this book has been like shooting the rapids of a wild river. One minute it’s calm, serene, floating dreamlike, the next moment anxious, the roar of unseen rapids in the ear followed by certain fear, and then exhilaration, survival, and safety until it is repeated all over again until finally, exhausted, we beach.

I have not been the captain on this voyage, not even the necessary pilot. I’ve only been a passenger at the observation deck, making notes. The captain has been my wife, Barbara, a poet, publisher, and keen editor with credits far exceeding mine. I acknowledge her as the one person who guided me over the years it took to research and write this book.

Of course, even two people cannot possibly accomplish the necessary labor that goes into a project such as this. There have been many who were always there when I needed them. Namely, the highly regarded Dennis Copeland, Monterey Public Library archivist and overseer of the California History Room and Archives, who scoured the depths of his files whenever called upon; Nikki Nedeff who sat beside me that sunny day at the lagoon on February 21, 2002, and told me the river’s history and then read draft after draft of the book making corrections, suggestions, and giving encouragement; as did Keith Vandevere, who knows the political side of the Carmel River better than anyone; and Stephen Davis of the U.S. Forest Service for his review of the Kirk Complex Fire account.

Special thanks to Jane Hohfeld Galante, who opened her Car-

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