CHAPTER 3
Moral and Instructive Tales

In an essay written in 1980, Nina Bawden, the author of many successful children’s books including Carrie’s War (1973) and The Peppermint Pig (1975), wrote a strongly worded essay attacking what have been called the ‘problem novels’ of the 1970s. These were books designed mainly for teenagers in which (she said) ‘fashionable social problems’ were ‘dragged in to satisfy some educational or social theory’ She lamented that this was what ‘superficial critics consider realism to be’. Since they were part of life, Bawden accepted, such subjects as poverty and divorce, learning disabilities and racism, should certainly not be ignored by children’s literature. But focusing on this kind of issue did not in itself make a book good, and it ought not to be a book’s only raison d’être. Nor should children’s books ‘be used as a kind of therapy’. Why should a poor child have to read of poverty? Why should anyone think that a child from a one-parent family would feel better after reading about other children from one-parent families? ‘The most important realism that children need,’ she insisted, ‘is the realism of the emotional landscape in which the book is set’. A children’s book, she concluded, ‘should be judged for the pleasure it gives, for its style and its quality’, not according to how well it serves ‘factions and interests and ideologies’.1

Bawden’s essay is a good place to start this chapter since it brings up the two issues of realism (the accurate depiction of everyday life) and didacticism (instruction for a specific purpose) which will link

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Children's Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Preface vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Chronology ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1- Fables 10
  • Chapter 2- Poetry 32
  • Chapter 3- Moral and Instructive Tales 61
  • Chapter 4- The School Story 87
  • Chapter 5- The Family Story 117
  • Chapter 6- Fantasy 144
  • Chapter 7- The Adventure Story 170
  • Conclusion 199
  • Student Resources 204
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.