Ladies for Liberty: Women Who Made a Difference in American History

By John Blundell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4. THE GRIMKé SISTERS

“So precious a talent as intellect never was given to be wrapt in a
napkin and buried in the earth.” —Angelina Grimké, Appeal to the
Christian Women of the Southern States


Anti-slavery and Women’s Rights Campaigners
Sarah Moore Grimké,
November 26, 1792–December 23, 1873
Angelina Emily Grimké,
February 20, 1805–October 26, 1879

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

SARAH and ANGELINA GRIMKÉ were born into good fortune. Their father, John Grimké, previously a lieutenant colonel in the Revolutionary War and speaker in the South Carolina House of Representatives, was now a plantation owner and judge in the state’s Supreme Court. The girls could look forward to a life of ease. In front of them lay a future of balls, concerts, picnics, rides, dinners, parties, and entertainments. They would spend their days in spacious rooms with high ceilings in beautifully decorated homes and stroll in well-manicured gardens. Their wardrobes would be of the finest kind, full of the latest

-35-

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Ladies for Liberty: Women Who Made a Difference in American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Table of Contents ix
  • Foreword 1
  • Introduction 5
  • Chapter 1- Mercy Otis Warren 7
  • Chapter 2- Martha Washington 17
  • Chapter 3- Abigail Adams 25
  • Chapter 4- The Grimké Sisters 35
  • Chapter 5- Sojourner Truth 49
  • Chapter 6- Elizabeth Cady Stanton 59
  • Chapter 7- Harriet Tubman 67
  • Chapter 8- Harriet Beecher Stowe 77
  • Chapter 9- Bina West Miller 83
  • Chapter 10- Madam C J Walker 91
  • Chapter 11- Laura Ingalls Wilder and Rose Wilder Lane 101
  • Chapter 12- Isabel Mary Paterson 111
  • Chapter 13- Lila Acheson Wallace 121
  • Chapter 14- Vivien Kellems 131
  • Chapter 15- Taylor Caldwell 141
  • Chapter 16- Clare Boothe Luce 149
  • Chapter 17- Ayn Rand 161
  • Chapter 18- Rose Director Friedman 173
  • Chapter 19- Jane Jacobs 185
  • Chapter 20- Dorian Fisher 195
  • Afterword 201
  • Ten Matters for Discussion 205
  • Further Reading 207
  • Acknowledgements 211
  • Index 213
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