Animal Rights: What Everyone Needs to Know

By Paul Waldau | Go to book overview

7
SOCIAL REALITIES

In the daily lives of humans are many opportunities to protect or harm nonhuman animals. Through consumer choices, environmentally sensitive acts, or treatment of nearby animals, individual humans create animal protections or harms. For this reason, social realities are as important as are the policy decisions that take place in political circles.


What are the prevailing attitudes today in different societies
regarding animals?

Attitudes around the world reveal that four different themes are now prevailing. Each country weaves these themes into a unique pattern depending upon cultural, religious, and political variables. It is not unusual, then, to find in a particular society that one of these themes is far more prominent than the other three themes. But if one looks closely enough, virtually all societies today reflect all four of these themes.

The first theme is diversity of attitudes, which has been mentioned as occurring in many societies and cultures. The second theme is change, which is grounded in the fact that societies around the globe are in deep ferment over our relationships with other living beings. The third theme is the continuing influence of traditional or inherited values, for these play an important part in the way people talk about the final theme,

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Animal Rights: What Everyone Needs to Know
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - General Information 1
  • 2 - The Animals Themselves 10
  • 3 - Philosophical Arguments 56
  • 4 - History and Culture 74
  • 5 - Laws 81
  • 6 - Political Realities 104
  • 7 - Social Realities 129
  • 8 - Education, the Professions, and the Arts 143
  • 9 - Contemporary Sciences– Natural and Social 162
  • 10 - Major Figures and Organizations in the Animal Rights Movement 173
  • 11 - The Future of Animal Rights 189
  • Time Line/Chronology of Important Events 201
  • Glossary 205
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 209
  • Index 215
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