1
Indigenous Traditions

We are as one: earth, sky, all living things, the two-legged, the four-legged,
the winged ones, the trees, the grasses.

—Sioux myth of White Buffalo Woman

Quetzalcoatl became famous for his moral principles. He had great
respect for all forms of life. He did not believe in killing flowers by picking
them, or killing any of the animals of the forest.

—Aztec myth of Quetzalcoatl

Unlike other chapters in this book, the present chapter does not deal with one particular religious tradition. Unlike religions discussed in subsequent chapters, indigenous religious traditions do not share a founder (as do Buddhists, and Muslims, for example); nor do they share a particular body of sacred texts (as do Hindus and Jews, for example). Indigenous religious traditions tend to be similar in critical ways, but each tradition is distinct and separate. I use the term “indigenous traditions” throughout this chapter, but I use the term only as a generalization. While most indigenous religious traditions will fit within the patterns mentioned herein—the vast majority, in fact—it is always likely that there is an exception to the rule.


“Indigenous”

It is difficult to determine exactly what indigenous means. What if a newborn Inuit, born in the Arctic, is adopted by French parents living in Paris? What does it mean for that individual to be indigenous to the Arctic if, as an adult, she is French in language, custom, and nationality? Is a German boy, adopted into a traditional Inuit tribe at birth, more “indigenous” than the Inuit adopted by a French couple? What about an Inuit who lives in the Arctic, works as a chiropractor, wears denim, drives a snowmobile, lives on fast-food fries, attends a Protestant church, and hunts seals with high-powered guns from fast-moving boats? Is she indigenous? What of human immigrants who left the land of their grandmothers in the eighteenth

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Animals and World Religions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Indigenous Traditions 19
  • 2 - Hindu Traditions 56
  • 3 - Buddhist Traditions 91
  • 4 - Chinese Traditions 127
  • 5 - Jewish Traditions 169
  • 6 - Christian Traditions 205
  • 7 - Islamic Traditions 241
  • Conclusion 277
  • Appendix- Factory Farming and Fishing 291
  • References 317
  • Further Reading 335
  • Index 339
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 346

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.