Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954

By Zoë Burkholder | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book has benefited from conversations with friends, family, and colleagues in history, anthropology, and education over the past several years. I am deeply indebted to these folks for making the research and writing of this book a pleasurable, and in many ways, collaborative experience. My greatest debt is to Jonathan Zimmerman, who has read and commented on countless drafts and offered his boundless enthusiasm, support, advice, and critique along the way. My colleagues and the dean at the School of Education and Human Services at Montclair State University have helped me complete the final stages of research and writing for this book since 2009. I would like to say a special thank-you to Ada Beth Cutler, our outstanding dean, and to Jeremy Price, the chair of the Department of Educational Foundations, both of whom have shown tremendous generosity in supporting my research in every way possible, including a very warm and genuine interest in my personal development as a scholar and as a teacher. My colleagues Jaime Grinberg, Tyson Lewis, Helenrose Fives, Alina Reznitskaya, Mark Weinstein, David Kennedy, Kathryn Herr, Maughn Gregory, Brian Carolan, Nicole DiDonato, Jamaal Matthews, and Tamara Lucas have ensured that my first years as an assistant professor have been productive and enjoyable. Thanks to our department administrator, Brenda Godbolt, who keeps our department running smoothly, and to the future teachers at Montclair State, whose passion for studying the history of education serves as a constant source of inspiration. A Faculty Student Research Grant from Montclair State University allowed me to benefit from the tireless research assistance of MSU students Kyle Benn and Jordan Helin. Thank you, Kyle and Jordan, for your thoughtful and insightful research and writing assistance.

I also owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University. As a fellow at the Warren Center in 2008–2009, I was able to do additional research and writing for this book as part of a year-long colloquium on “Race-Making and Law-Making in the

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