Crisis of Conservatism? The Republican Party, the Conservative Movement and American Politics after Bush

By Joel D. Aberbach; Gillian Peele | Go to book overview

1
Introduction
The Ending of the Conservative Era ?

GILLIAN PEELE AND JOEL D. ABERBACH

The 2008 victory of Barack Obama was widely seen as a dramatic turning point in the political history of the United States. Not only did the election bring an AfricanAmerican to the presidency, but the Democrat’s success on the slogan of “change we can believe in” seemingly brought to a close a long period, running from the 1980 election of Ronald Reagan, in which the Republican Party and conservative values had dominated the country’s political discourse.

Obama’s triumph and John McCain’s defeat were thus generally seen as signaling something more fundamental than the triumph of a charismatic Democrat over a Republican standard-bearer. Indeed, it was interpreted as portending much more than a strong endorsement of the Democratic Party over the Republicans, although the 2008 congressional election results certainly made it a very good year for Democrats, whose position was greatly aided by the dire state of the economy. The 2008 elections appeared to many to mark a shift of national mood and a decisive rejection of the conservative ideas that had shaped the modern Republican Party and of the broad and multifaceted conservative movement that had become a major force in American political life. The nature of the Democratic triumph thus raised questions not just about the future of the Republican Party but about the coherence and resilience of the wider conservative movement. Even if Obama himself deliberately projected a centrist approach that eschewed ideology, many observers saw in the 2008 elections the death of American conservatism and a reorientation of the country’s public philosophy towards progressive values and liberalism.1

One powerful factor leading commentators to predict an unhappy future for the American right was its internal disunity. By November 2008, there were already several signs that the conservative coalition was under strain, with bitter controversies about the content and conduct of policy under George W. Bush. The handling of the economy, the management of the war in Iraq, and the adoption of policies such as No Child Left Behind and the Medicare prescription drug benefit smacked of big

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Crisis of Conservatism? The Republican Party, the Conservative Movement and American Politics after Bush
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 403

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.