Five to Rule Them All: The UN Security Council and the Making of the Modern World

By David L. Bosco | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

MOISÉS NAÍM, editor of Foreign Policy, encouraged and guided me when this project was in the formative stages. Dean Louis Goodman, Maria Green Cowles, and Tamar Gutner at the American University School of International Service generously offered me, first, a place to write and then the opportunity to teach that institution’s remarkable students. My agent, Raphael Sagalyn, worked with me patiently as I turned a vague idea into a proposal. Susan Ferber at Oxford University Press believed in the project at the outset and expertly guided me at every stage.

I benefited from the patience and insight of several people at the United Nations. Norma Chan, an institution in her own right, shared her expertise and experience and arranged a trip with the Security Council to Africa. Yves Sorokobi was generous and graceful in accommodating myriad requests during that trip. Liam Murphy at the UN Information Center in Washington was unfailingly efficient in responding to a blizzard of requests to visit the archives and for assistance in locating documents.

My research assistant at the School of International Service, Margaret Olsen, tracked down council debates, unraveled obscure points, and provided thoughtful comments throughout the drafting process. Svetlana Savranskaya at George Washington University and Alexandra Kapitanskaya, a master’s candidate at the School of International Service, assisted me with several Russian sources. Sam Daws helped to arrange a productive research trip to London and reviewed an early manuscript. Ed Luck at Columbia University encouraged me and directed me to several interesting sources as I began my research. Katharine Thomson at Churchill College, Cambridge, arranged access to the diaries of several British diplomats and helped me review oral history interviews with many more. Thomas

-ix-

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Five to Rule Them All: The UN Security Council and the Making of the Modern World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1- The Council Created 10
  • Chapter 2- Fits and Starts (1946–1956) 39
  • Chapter 3- The Court of World Opinion (1957–1967) 80
  • Chapter 4- A Hostile Environment (1968–1985) 112
  • Chapter 5- The Ice Breaks (1986–1993) 148
  • Chapter 6- Growing Pains (1994–2001) 184
  • Chapter 7- A More Dangerous World (2001–2006) 216
  • Conclusion- The Council in Context 249
  • Notes 257
  • Sources and Further Reading 287
  • Index 299
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