Flight from Monticello: Thomas Jefferson at War

By Michael Kranish | Go to book overview
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Flight from Monticello: Thomas Jefferson at War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Prologue xi
  • Williamsburg 1
  • The Gentleman Has Spoken Treason 3
  • A Determination Never to Do What Is Wrong 15
  • What Is to Become of Children—Divided? 28
  • All Men Are Born Free 34
  • Revolution 41
  • With What Majesty Do We Ride There above the Storms! 43
  • The Horrid Disposition of the Times 61
  • We Must Be Prepared to Destroy It 68
  • Save Us from Ruin 84
  • He Lost Everything 96
  • Fiery, Hot and Impetuous 100
  • Who Would Have Expected All This Here? 108
  • The Conflagration in the Night 114
  • The Enemy Will Commit Great Ravages 120
  • Almost the Whole County Was Inflaim’D 126
  • This Dangerous Fire Is Only Smothered 134
  • Whom Can We Trust Now? 140
  • Bring Him Alive to Headquarters 149
  • Invasion 157
  • Beyond All My Fears 159
  • A Fatal Inattention 166
  • The Most Wretched Situation That Can Be Conceived 176
  • Seemed like the Day of Judgment Was Come 187
  • The Enemy Mean to Overrun Us 200
  • You Loyalists Won’t Do Anything 207
  • Honor Is like an Island 212
  • We Must Give It Up 224
  • Burnt All Their Houses 232
  • Uncommon Dangers Require Uncommon Remedies 239
  • No Wagons, No Intelligence, Not One Spy 244
  • Bring Our Whole Force into Virginia 252
  • Flight from Monticello 267
  • A Terrible Clatter of Horses 269
  • British Horse Came to Monticello 283
  • The Unfortunate Passages in My Conduct 294
  • Liberty! 302
  • Time Wastes Too Fast 312
  • Devoutly Pray for His Death 319
  • There Is Not a Truth Existing Which I Fear 326
  • Acknowledgments 333
  • Notes 337
  • Suggested Reading 371
  • Index 375
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 388

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.