Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach

By Christopher Meyers | Go to book overview

4
The Moral Justification
for Journalism

Sandra L. Borden

As Lee Wilkins argues in her article in this collection, journalism seems to come into its own during natural disasters. The sheer drama of such events makes for great storytelling and provides a national showcase for the talents of local reporters. This was illustrated again in 2005 when the great flood caused by Hurricane Katrina overcame New Orleans and chased out the staff of the Times-Picayune. At first, the paper was unable to issue a print edition and instead published on its affiliated Nola.com Web site. HELP US, PLEASE was the headline read by millions around the country and around the world. When the Picayune finally was able to produce a print edition, staffers gave it out for free at the Convention Center, where thousands of trapped survivors eagerly sought copies. Summing up the significance of what these journalists did, the Columbia Journalism Review contributor Douglas McCollam wrote:

Living mostly in borrowed houses, often separated from friends and
family, wearing donated clothes, and working with hand-me-down
equipment and donated office space, the paper managed to produce
coverage of the disaster that serves to remind us all of just how deep
is the connection between a city and its newspaper, how much they
need each other.1

There seems to be more to the Picayune’s actions than the thrill of what-a-story or the calculations of career climbing. Indeed, whether it is Los Angeles during the 1994 earthquake, or Grand Forks, North Dakota, during the 1997 flood, journalists often set aside competitive considerations to help their colleagues and endure extreme personal hardships to give communities the news they need. So

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.