Labeling Genetically Modified Food: The Philosophical and Legal Debate

By Paul Weirich | Go to book overview

Contributors

Carl Cranor is professor of philosophy at the University of California– Riverside, specializing in legal and moral philosophy. He has written widely on philosophic issues at the intersection of science and the law. Some of that research focused on philosophic issues in risk assessment and the regulation of toxic substances. Some has been concerned with philosophical analysis of the acceptability of risks as well as with issues concerning genetically modified organisms. More recent research concerns philosophic issues on the use of science in the tort law as well as work clarifying aspects of the Precautionary Principle. He has written Regulating Toxic Substances: A Philosophy of Science and the Law (Oxford University Press, 1993), as well as numerous articles in philosophy, science, and law journals. He has just completed Toxic Torts: Science, Law and the Possibility of Justice (2006). As a Congressional Fellow, he worked at the U.S. Congress’s Office of Technology Assessment, co-authoring The Identification and Regulation of Carcinogens (1987). He also served on California’s Proposition 65 Science Advisory Panel as well as its Electric and Magnetic Fields Science Advisory Panel. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Collegium Ramazzini. He received his B.A. degree from the University of Colorado (mathematics), a Ph.D. from UCLA (philosophy), and an M.S.L. (Master of Studies in Law) from Yale Law School.

Fred H. Degnan is a partner in King & Spalding’s Washington, D.C. office, where since 1988 he has specialized in food and drug law. Prior to coming to King & Spalding, he served for 11 years in the FDA’s Office of Chief Counsel, where he had substantial experience with FDA litigation and enforcement and served as the agency’s associate chief counsel for foods. He received the agency’s highest awards. At King & Spalding, he represents several large multinational food companies, a number of domestic drug producers, several international science-based nonprofit associations, and several biotechnology companies. Since 1989, in addition to his responsibilities at King & Spalding, he has taught food and drug law at the Catholic University of America’s Columbus School of Law, where he serves as a Distinguished Lecturer.

Margaret (Peggy) Rosso Grossman is Bock Chair and professor of agricultural law in the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She teaches courses in agricultural law, environmental

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