Policing the Roman Empire: Soldiers, Administration, and Public Order

By Christopher J. Fuhrmann | Go to book overview

Index
abetting See harboring
abuse
See brutality, corruption
Acta Alexandrinorum 140–42
adultery 50
advocates, city 72
aediles, municipal 55, 62, 64, 242
aediles of Rome 59, 93–94, 116, 119–20, 131
Aegean Sea 95
Aesop 39
afterlife, punishment in 46–47
Aga Bey Köyü (imperial estate) 149, 199, 218
agentes in rebus 152, 155, 221, 244
agents provocateurs 143
Agrippa 142
Agrippa Postumus 126
Agrippina Minor 126, 195
agoranomoi 59–61, 66
Alexander Severus (emperor 222–235) 144
Alexandria 104, 141–42, 159, 203 hostility toward Jews 76, 141, 158
amnesty 102
anecdotes as evidence 16
Antioch 151, 156, 219
in late antiquity 154, 201
Antonii, M. (grandfather and father of Mark Antony) 95
Antoninus Pius (emperor 161–180) 35, 73, 128, 182, 224
Antony, Mark 96
Aphrodisias 217, 219, 224
Apollonios (stratêgos) 76–77
Apollonius of Tyana 137
Apollonopolis-Heptakomia nome 76–77
Apollonopolites Heptakomias 77
apparitoresSee attendants
appeal 158, 175, 198, 242
Appian 101–102
Apuleius 18, 183 See alsoGolden Ass
Aragua (Phrygia) 168
a rationibus secretaries 40
archephodoi 6, 78–80, 86
archiphylax (Lycia) 67
archive 77, 81
archons 59, 66
Aricia (grove of Diana) 26
Aristides, Aelius 67–68, 71, 90
arms 49, 51–52, 102, 205–6
civilian police armament 57, 69–70, 74
improvised weapons 95
search for 139
army 239
and Augustus 104–6
as large-scale police institution 104, 182, 203–4
noncombat work 105–6
arrest 6, 78–82, 85–86
citizen arrest 52
of Jesus 53, 240
Arrian of Nicomedia 181

-319-

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