Religious Liberties: Anti-Catholicism and Liberal Democracy in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Literature and Culture

By Elizabeth Fenton | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

On April 14, 2006—the day I defended the dissertation that laid the groundwork for this book—my mother, Tess Fenton, was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia. In the six months that transpired between her diagnosis and death, and in the years that followed after, I came to realize how fortunate I am to be surrounded by family, friends, and colleagues concerned with my well-being as well as my work. This book would have proved an impossible task without the enduring love and support of my family. I’d like to thank my father, Mike Fenton, for encouraging my pursuits, intellectual and otherwise, and for just being there, always. I thank my brother, John Fenton, for taking me seriously but never allowing me to take myself too seriously. My extended family has been a heroic army of encouragement. Thank you, Janice Avery, Brigid and Mary Beebe, Alan Fenton, Jerry and Mary Fenton, Vesta Fenton, and Gayl Sanderson. Though they are not related to us, Drs. Pamela Ely and Samer Kasbari, along with the rest of the One West staff at the Norris Cotton Cancer Center in the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, treated my family like family. For that, I cannot thank them enough.

I owe debts of gratitude to many people and institutions. Caroline Levander had faith in this project before I did, and I have benefited immeasurably from her encouragement and friendship. I am also grateful to Anthony Pinn for his unflagging support. Tracy Fessenden gave me some of the best advice for shaping the direction of this book. Bob Levine has read drafts, written letters, and offered good advice over the years—I owe him a lot. I am also grateful to Rachel Adams, Tim Marr, and Ken

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