V
MEDITERRANEAN
HEGEMONY

KEY DATES IN CHAPTER V
272 BCRome defeats Tarentum, the major Greek city of southern Italy, just three years after the departure of Pyrrhus
264–241 BCThe first Punic war resulting in the defeat of Carthage and Rome’s first overseas province, Sicily
225 BCThe battle of Telamon marks the defeat of the Gauls of northern Italy. Conquest and colonization of the area resumed after the defeat of Hannibal
218–201 BCThe second Punic war, during which Hannibal invaded Italy and remained there until 203
216 BCThe battle of Cannae, Rome’s most serious defeat at the hands of Hannibal
213–211 BCSiege and capture of Syracuse by Marcellus
202 BCBattle of Zama. Scipio defeats Hannibal just outside Carthage
197 BCKing Philip V of Macedon defeated at the battle of Cynoscephalae. The next year Flamininus declares the freedom of the Greeks
193–188 BCWar between Rome and Antiochus III of Syria. Antiochus defeated first at Thermopylae and then Magnesia, and in the Treaty of Apamea in 188 renounced all Seleucid claims to Asia Minor
189 BCManlius Vulso campaigns against the Galatians in central Anatolia
184 BCThe censorship of Cato the Elder
168 BCKing Perseus of Macedon defeated at the battle of Pydna. Macedonian kingdom dismantled
168 BCThe Seleucid King Antiochus IV is forbidden to invade Egypt by an envoy of the Senate
167–150 BCPolybius of Megalopolis a hostage in Rome, where he becomes a friend of Scipio Africanus and accompanies him on his campaigns
149–146 BCThird Punic war culminates in the Roman destruction of Carthage
146 BCRoman destruction of Corinth
133 BCThe capture of the Celtiberian stronghold of Numantia in Spain
133 BCAttalus III of Pergamum dies leaving his kingdom to Rome

-62-

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Rome: An Empire's Story
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xii
  • List of Maps xiv
  • Notes on Further Reading xv
  • I - The Whole Story xvi
  • II - Empires of the Mind 13
  • III - Rulers of Italy 30
  • IV - Imperial Ecology 48
  • V - Mediterranean Hegemony 62
  • VI - Slavery and Empire 82
  • VII - Crisis 96
  • VIII - At Heaven’s Command? 113
  • IX - The Generals 128
  • X - The Enjoyment of Empire 146
  • XI - Emperors 162
  • XII - Resourcing Empire 185
  • XIII - War 200
  • XIV - Imperial Identities 218
  • XV - Recovery and Collapse 232
  • XVI - A Christian Empire 254
  • XVII - Things Fall Apart 272
  • XVIII - The Roman Past and the Roman Future 288
  • Notes 301
  • Bibliography 327
  • Glossary of Technical Terms 357
  • Photographic Acknowledgements 361
  • Index 362
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