The Rise and Fall of Franklin Delano Roosevelt

By Robert Underhill | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1. EUROPE AFTER THE FIRST WORLD WAR

“With supreme irony, the war to “make the world safe for
democracy” ended by leaving democracy more unsafe than at
any time since the collapse of revolutions in 1848.”

—James Harvey Robinson

Countries in central Europe were competing with one another, and relations already were sour in June of 1914 when Archduke Francis Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated by young Bosnian revolutionaries —recognized as agents of a terrorist Serbian society dedicated to overthrow Austrian control. As the murderous event became known, citizens throughout the world were outraged and sympathetic toward Austrian claims for satisfaction.1

Aware of the assassination plot, the Serbian government had done nothing to stop it or even warn the Austrian government. Most of the Austrian crown council favored immediate declaration of war against Serbia, but the declaration was delayed a month until the end of July, when Austria formally declared war on Serbia.

Meanwhile, Russian governments in turmoil undertook a general mobilization program. Germany interpreted this program as a threat to its own eastern frontier and sent a 12-hour ultimatum to Russia, demanding cessation of military preparations on the German frontier. The twelve hours passed, and Germany, having received no reply to its ultimatum, declared war on Russia on August 1, 1914. German diplomats next sent

-3-

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The Rise and Fall of Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Table of Contents xiii
  • Foreword 1
  • Chapter 1- Europe after the First World War 3
  • Chapter 2- America’s Great Depression 11
  • Chapter 3- Franklin Roosevelt- The Early Years 17
  • Chapter 4- FDR- Emerging Politician 23
  • Chapter 5- Seizing the Crown 27
  • Chapter 6- Advisors and Aides 31
  • Chapter 7- FDR- First Media President 39
  • Chapter 8- Supreme Court Imbroglio 43
  • Chapter 9- Europe’s War–1939 53
  • Chapter 10- Third Term 59
  • Chapter 11- Lend Lease 69
  • Chapter 12- Intervention or Isolation 77
  • Chapter 13- Barbarossa 91
  • Chapter 14- Troubled Waters 101
  • Chapter 15- Americana 1941 109
  • Chapter 16- The Labor Front 113
  • Chapter 17- From Marriage to Alliance 119
  • Chapter 18- Empire of the Rising Sun 127
  • Chapter 19- Atlantic Charter 133
  • Chapter 20- Enter the Scientists 141
  • Chapter 21- Undeclared War 1941 147
  • Chapter 22- Russia- The Enigma 153
  • Chapter 23- Japan- Expansion and Perfidy 161
  • Chapter 24- Infamy 171
  • Chapter 25- FDR- A Reckoning 179
  • Bibliography 195
  • Notes 199
  • Index 209
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