Hollywood Left and Right: How Movie Stars Shaped American Politics

By Steven J. Ross | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

After ten years of working on this project, I find myself indebted to many friends and institutions. I am grateful to the University of Southern California for its unstinting research support and to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for granting me its Film Scholars Award. This book never could have been completed without the cooperation of librarians and archivists around the country. The following institutions and people were especially helpful in guiding me to important sources: the Cinema/Television Library (Ned Comstock) and Special Collections (Dace Taube and Claude Zachary) at the University of Southern California; the Margaret Herrick Library (Barbara Hall, Faye Thompson, and Linda Mehr); the Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, Tamiment Library (Kevyne Baar) at New York University; the Huntington Library (Peter Blodgett); the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library (Matt Schaefer); Special Collections, UCLA Library; the Special Collections Department and the Theater Arts Collection, New York Public Library; the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library; Oral History Collection and Special Collections, Columbia University Library; the Wisconsin Historical Society; and the Film Studies Center, Museum of Modern Art. A special thanks to Marc Wanamaker at Bison Archives and Brent Earle at Photofest for gathering photographs for the book.

Over the years, my arguments were sharpened by exchanges with participants in the Columbia University American History Seminar, the Shelby Cullom Davis Center Seminar at Princeton University, the Center for the United States and the Cold War Seminar at New York University, and the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities at USC. Thanks to my research assistants Dina Bartolini, Caroline Garrity, and Andreas Petasis. Thanks,

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