Planet Taco: A Global History of Mexican Food

By Jeffrey M. Pilcher | Go to book overview

NOTES

PREFACE

1. Salvador Novo, Cocina mexicana, o historia gastronomica de la Ciudad de México (1967; reprint: Mexico City: Editorial Porrúa, 1993).

2. Sonia Corcuera de Mancera, Entre gula y templanza: Un aspecto de la historia mexicana, 3rd ed. (Mexico City: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1991); Jeffrey M. Pilcher, ¡Que vivan los tamales! Food and the Making of Mexican Identity (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1998); Janet Long-Solís and Luis Alberto Vargas, Food Culture in Mexico (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 2005); José Luis Juárez López, Nacionalismo culinario: La cocina mexicana en el siglo XX (Mexico City: CONACULTA, 2008).

3. Steffan Igor Ayora-Diaz, “Regionalism and the Institution of the Yucatecan Gastronomic Field,” Food, Culture and Society 13, no. 3 (September 2010): 397–420.


INTRODUCTION

1. “Day Job: Taco Bell Employee,” The New Yorker, April 24, 2000, 185.

2. George Ritzer, The McDonaldization of Society (Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Pine Forge Press, 1993).

3. Quoted in “History,” available at http://www.tacobell.com (accessed March 17, 2004).

4. Pascal Ory, “Gastronomy,” in Traditions, vol. 2 of Realms of Memory: The Construction of the French Past, ed. Pierre Nora, trans. Arthur Goldhammer (New York: Columbia University Press, 1997), 445.

5. Some authors have proposed indigenous derivations of the word, including tlaco, meaning “half,” as in a folded-over tortilla. Salvador Novo attributed the word’s origin to the Nahuatl tacol, which is usually translated as “shoulder” but refers more expansively to any cylinder surrounding a soft interior, such as the mound of dirt gathered around a newly transplanted tree or a penis filled with semen. Having been viciously taunted for his homosexuality, Novo doubtless enjoyed the thought of taco-munching machos symbolically imitating the act of oral sex.

-233-

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Planet Taco: A Global History of Mexican Food
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction - A Tale of Two Tacos 1
  • Part I - Proto-Tacos 19
  • Chapter 1 - Maize and the Making of Mexico 21
  • Chapter 2 - Burritos in the Borderlands 46
  • Part II - National Tacos 77
  • Chapter 3 - From the Pastry War to Parisian Mole 79
  • Chapter 4 - The Rise and Fall of the Chili Queens 105
  • Chapter 5 - Inventing the Mexican American Taco 130
  • Part III - Global Tacos 161
  • Chapter 6 - The First Wave of Global Mexican 163
  • Chapter 7 - The Blue Corn Bonanza 189
  • Conclusion - The Battle of the Taco Trucks 221
  • Notes 233
  • Glossary 263
  • Select Bibliography 268
  • Index 283
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