Tales from a Revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the Transformation of Early America

By James D. Rice | Go to book overview

Three
THE GOVERNOR AND THE REBEL

POSSECLAY, CHIEF OF THE OCCANEECHEES, WAS UNEASY ABOUT the presence of the newly established Susquehannock forts so close to his own people’s fortified town at the ford on the Roanoke River. It was one thing for the Susquehannocks to trade occasionally in the Southern Piedmont, as they had in the past, but another matter altogether for them to live there. Their presence, and their search for allies and trading partners, was profoundly unsettling. As the Susquehannocks struggled to fit into their new environment, they inevitably made some missteps. Word soon spread that they had run afoul of “the other lesser nations of the Indians and so made them their Enimies.”

The Susquehannocks were well aware of their precarious situation and their dire need of friends. In February 1676 Edmund Andros, governor of New York and New Jersey, heard that a Susquehannock emissary had approached one of his officers to discuss a treaty. New York was already locked into an alliance with the Five Nations Iroquois, the very people who had driven the Susquehannocks out of the north and into the arms of the

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Tales from a Revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the Transformation of Early America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Narratives in American History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • A Note on Language and Documentation xix
  • Part One - "The Uproars of Virginia" 1
  • One - Doegs! Doegs! 3
  • Two - The Susquehannocks’ Dilemma 29
  • Three - The Governor and the Rebel 42
  • Four - "I Am in over Shoes, I Will Be in over Boots" 54
  • Five - Jamestown Burning 76
  • Six - "The Uproars of Virginia Have Been Stupendious" 97
  • Seven - ‘A Seasonable Submission’ 118
  • Part Two - "The Second Part of the Late Tragedy" 135
  • Eight - Strange Indians and Popish Plots 137
  • Nine - "An Itching Desire" 152
  • Ten - Tales of a Revolution 170
  • Eleven - Bacon’s Heirs 183
  • Afterword 203
  • Abbreviations 225
  • Notes 227
  • Select Bibliography 241
  • Index 245
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