Tales from a Revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the Transformation of Early America

By James D. Rice | Go to book overview

Eight
STRANGE INDIANS AND POPISH PLOTS

BACON’S FOLLOWERS LAID DOWN THEIR ARMS BUT DID NOT abandon the struggle. Late in 1676, while the royal commissioners were still under sail from England and loyalist forces were just beginning to score major victories over the rebels, an anonymous colonist penned a “Complaint from Heaven with a Huy and crye and a petition out of Virginia and Maryland.” Addressing himself to the king, Parliament, and the lord mayor and alderman of London, the author wrote that Bacon’s death merely marked the end of the first act of the play. “Now,” the author warned, “begins the second part of the late tragedy.” He predicted a “longe destructive warr” in which everything that truly mattered was at stake. Nothing less than the grand struggle between God and Satan was being played out in America, through the actions of their Protestant, Catholic, and Indian surrogates.

“It is high time, that the originall Cause” of Bacon’s Rebellion was revealed, the “Complaint” began. The “Barklian and Baltimorian Parties” had disguised their real intentions, which were “to overturn England with feyer, sword, and distractions [and] drive us

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Tales from a Revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the Transformation of Early America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Narratives in American History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • A Note on Language and Documentation xix
  • Part One - "The Uproars of Virginia" 1
  • One - Doegs! Doegs! 3
  • Two - The Susquehannocks’ Dilemma 29
  • Three - The Governor and the Rebel 42
  • Four - "I Am in over Shoes, I Will Be in over Boots" 54
  • Five - Jamestown Burning 76
  • Six - "The Uproars of Virginia Have Been Stupendious" 97
  • Seven - ‘A Seasonable Submission’ 118
  • Part Two - "The Second Part of the Late Tragedy" 135
  • Eight - Strange Indians and Popish Plots 137
  • Nine - "An Itching Desire" 152
  • Ten - Tales of a Revolution 170
  • Eleven - Bacon’s Heirs 183
  • Afterword 203
  • Abbreviations 225
  • Notes 227
  • Select Bibliography 241
  • Index 245
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