Temples for a Modern God: Religious Architecture in Postwar America

By Jay M. Price | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION

1. From Pauline Robertson, “The Sound of Hammering,” Protestant Church Administration & Equipment (later Protestant Church Buildings and Equipment), hereafter PC, November 1962, 48.

2. Program for service of dedication for the first unit of Providence Baptist Church, May 24, 1959, William A. Harrell Papers, Southern Baptist Historical Society and Archives, hereafter Harrell Papers. See also the website for Providence Baptist Church at www.providencebc.org/history

3. James David Hudnut-Beumler, “Suburban Jeremiads: Religion and Social Criticism of the American Dream in the 1950s,” PhD dissertation, Princeton University, 1989; Robert Wuthnow, The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith since World War II (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988); Margaret Lambert Bendroth, Growing Up Protestant: Parents, Children, and Mainline Churches (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2002); Kevin Michael Schultz, Tri-Faith America: How Catholics and Jews Held Postwar America to Its Protestant Promise (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011); Robert S. Ellwood, 1950: Crossroads of American Religious Life (Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2000); Etan Diamond, Souls of the City: Religion and the Search for Community in Postwar America (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003); Daniel Sack, Whitebread Protestants: Food and Religion in American Culture. (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000); Michael E. Staub, ed., The Jewish 1960s: An American Sourcebook (Waltham, MA: Brandeis University Press, 2004); Patrick Allitt, Religion in America since 1945: A History (New York: Columbia University Press, 2003); David Kaufman, Shul with a Pool: The “Synagogue Center” in American Jewish History (Hanover: University Press of New England, 1999).

4. Editorial, PC, Fall 1953, 6.

5. Donald A. Tenoever, “Edward J. Schulte and American Church Architecture of the Twentieth Century,” MA thesis: University of Cincinnati, 1974; Susan G. Solomon, Louis I. Kahn’s Jewish Architecture: Mikveh Israel and the Midcentury Synagogue (Waltham, MA: Brandeis University Press, 2009); Kimberly J. Elman and Angela Giral, eds., Percival Goodman: ArchitectPlannerTeacherPainter (New York: Columbia University in the City of New York, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery 2001); Stanford Lehmberg, Churches for the Southwest: The Ecclesiastical Architecture of John Gaw Meem (New York: W.W. Norton, 2005); Robert Allen Nauman, On the Wings of Modernism: The United States Air Force Academy (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2004); Patricia Talbot Davis,

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Temples for a Modern God: Religious Architecture in Postwar America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 2
  • Chapter 1 - The Search for a Better Church Building 20
  • Chapter 2 - The Postwar House of Worship 48
  • Chapter 3 - Postwar Religious Building 78
  • Chapter 4 - Making a Modern Church Still Look like a Church 118
  • Chapter 5 - "Let’s Stop Building Cathedrals" 146
  • Conclusion - An Unappreciated Legacy 172
  • Notes 187
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 247
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