The Making of a Catholic President: Kennedy vs. Nixon 1960

By Shaun A. Casey | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would never have completed this book without the support of three remarkable institutions. First and foremost, Wesley Theological Seminary, where I teach, has been supportive in research funding, sabbatical leave, and moral support. I am most appreciative of the support of President David McAllister Wilson and Dean Bruce Birch. Second, the Center for American Progress (CAP), under the leadership of John Podesta, is the rare Washington-based progressive think tank that takes religion seriously as a powerful force in American democracy. I thank John, Melody Barnes, and Sally Steenland for providing me with a home away from home as a Visiting Fellow at CAP. Third, the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion at Wabash College provided me with the initial research funding to launch this project. My thanks are due to Lucinda Huffaker, Ted Hiebert, and Elizabeth Bounds for their early encouragement.

Over the years I have been the beneficiary of so many rich conversation partners on matters political and theological. I would like to thank my siblings—Karen Casey, Michael Casey, Neil Casey, and Rita Casey—and my parents, Melba and Paul Casey, for a lively household growing up and for their ongoing love, friendship, and debate. Many of my teachers, friends, and colleagues deserve special mention: Malaika Amon, Mark Bennington, Sathi Clarke, Brent Coffin, Harvey Cox, John Crossan, Eric Crump, Missy Daniel, E. J. Dionne, Mark Elrod, Francis Fiorenza, Mark Hamilton, Don Haymes, Bryan Hehir, Craig Hill, Stanley Hoffmann, Jan and Richard Hughes, William Stacy Johnson, John Kerry, Helmut Koester, Michael Koppel, Kim Lawton,

-vii-

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The Making of a Catholic President: Kennedy vs. Nixon 1960
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1- The Ghost of Al Smith 3
  • 2- The Lay of the Land 30
  • 3- First Skirmishes 52
  • 4- Preparing for Battle 81
  • 5- Mobilizing the Troops 101
  • 6- Guerrilla Warfare 123
  • 7- A Lion in a Den of Daniels 151
  • 8- The Endgame 177
  • Epilogue 200
  • Notes 207
  • Index 235
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