The Role of Parliament in Curbing Corruption

By Rick Stapenhurst; Niall Johnston et al. | Go to book overview

3
On the Political Nature of Corruption

Daniel Lederman, Norman V. Loayza, and Rodrigo R. Soares


Introduction

Corruption is generally regarded as one of the most serious obstacles to development. Recent evidence shows corruption has a negative impact on important economic outcomes. Mauro (1995) and Burki and Perry (1998) claim that corruption reduces economic growth through reduced private investment; Kaufmann, Kraay and Zoido-Loboton (1999) find that corruption limits development, as measured by per capita income, child mortality, and literacy; and Bai and Wei (2000) argue that corruption affects the making of economic policy. Therefore, it is important to understand the determinants of corruption and the limitations that they impose on the prospects of growth and development.

In the previous chapter, Kaufmann and Dininio investigated the causes of corruption and also presented a multifaceted anti-corruption strategy. In this chapter, we explore in more detail two of the five strategies presented in chapter 2: political accountability and the structure of public sector management.

The literature in political science and economics has made numerous efforts in this direction and has stressed the importance of political institutions in shaping the patterns of government corruption; nevertheless, the corresponding empirical literature is relatively scarce.1 This chapter summarizes our attempts to contribute to the emerging empirical literature on the determinants of government corruption across countries and over time, with particular attention devoted to the role of political institutions.2

We will show that political and economic institutions affect corruption through two channels: political accountability and the structure of provision of public goods. Political mechanisms that increase political accountability, either by encouraging punishment of corrupt individuals or by reducing the informational problem related to government activities, tend to reduce the incidence of corruption. Likewise, economic

1 Though still scarce, the empirical literature on political institutions and corruption is growing. Some important contributions are Tanzi (1998); La Porta et al. (1999); Fisman and Gatti (2000); Treisman (2000); Persson, Tabellini, and Trebbi (2001); and Kunicova and Rose-Ackerman (2002).

2 This case study summarizes the analyses contained in Lederman, Loayza, and Soares 2005.

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Role of Parliament in Curbing Corruption
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 264

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.