Documents for the Study of the Gospels

By David R. Cartlidge; David L. Dungan | Go to book overview

MARTYRDOM
Zeno

Introduction: Zeno, the founder of the Stoic school of Greek philosophy, was an older contemporary of Socrates, coming to Athens from his native island of Cyprus around the year 480 B.C. There are various conflicting stories of Zeno’s death. One common account relates that he lived to the extraordinary age of 98 and finally strangled himself out of contempt for his physical frailty. A more popular version, by the time of Diogenes Laertius, had it that he was executed because of his attempts to overthrow a variously identified local king.


Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers 9.26

Zeno was a great man, both in respect to philosophy and as a politician. His books, at any rate, are full of understanding. He was disposed to unseat the tyrant Nearchos—others say, Diomedon—and was arrested; thus says Herakleides in “The Epitome of Satyros.” At that time he was questioned as to the identity of his fellow conspirators and concerning the weapons which he was taking to Lipara. He named all of the tyrant’s friends, wishing to leave him without supporters. Then he told the king he had something to whisper in his ear about certain people. When the king leaned over he bit his ear and did not let go until he was stabbed to death, suffering the same death as Aristogeiton, the killer of the tyrant.

Demetrios says, in “Men of the Same Name,” that Zeno bit off his (the king’s) nose. Antisthenes says, in “Successions of the Philosophers,” that after Zeno incriminated the tyrant’s friends he was asked by the tyrant if there were anyone else to indict. He answered, “You, the pestilence of the city!” And to those standing by he said, “I am amazed at your cowardice, that on account of the very things which I now endure you are slaves of the tyrant.” Finally he bit off his own tongue and spit it at the tyrant. The citizens were so incited that immediately they stoned the tyrant to death. The majority of authors mainly agree in this. But Hermippos says Zeno was thrown into a mortar and butchered.

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Documents for the Study of the Gospels
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 299

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.